Centramatic, tire balancers
space
space

"MrTruck Reviews" as seen on


space

Untitled 1



Diesel
Particulate
Filters,
a
Hot
Subject.







In
January
2007,
the
new
emission
law
went
into
effect
for
diesels.
Of
course
the
new
diesel
engines
designed
for
lower
emissions
cost
more,
have
EGR
coolers,
throttles,
use
more
expensive
CJ4
low
ash
classification
engine
oil
and
have
a
Diesel
Particulate
Filter.
The
DPF
is
where
pollutants
are
trapped
and
burned
off
when
it
regenerates.
With
the
new
ultra
low
sulfur
diesels,
Ford
6.4L,
Dodge
6.7L
and
GM
6.6L
LMM, 
their
Diesel
Particulate
Filter
can
get
to
1100
degrees
F
when
it’s
regenerating
(burning
up
the
noxious
oxide.)
If
the
DPF
is
almost
full,
it
can
take
up
to
30
minutes
to
burn
out
as
your
drive.
If
you
remember
when
catalytic
converters
first
came
out,
we
had
many wheat
field
and
grass
fires.
Look
at
the
tailpipe
on
these
new
diesels,
some
look
like
a
propane
weed
burner,
but
are
designed
for
cooling
the
exhaust
where
it
leaves
the
truck.

 

 




As
you
run
your
diesel,
sensors
in
the
DPF
measure
the
amount
of
particulate
matter
that
is
accumulating
in
the
filter
and
send
that
data
to
the
engine
computer
that
controls
the
engine
and
aftertreatment
process.
When
DPF
sensors
tell
the
engine
computer
that
the
DPF
is
filling
up,
a
self-cleaning
process
called
regeneration
will
raise
the
temperature
in
the
DPF
by
turning
on
an
injector
during
the
exhaust
stroke
to
oxidizes
the
particulate
matter.




In
some
trucks
you
can
smell
the
DPF
regeneration
and
feel
some
power
gain
when
finished.
Under
normal
operating
conditions,
you
don’t
need
to
do
anything.
If
you
do
a
lot
of
city
driving
or
hours
of
idling,
your
engine
may
not
be
working
hard
enough
to
regenerate.
This
can
cause
warning
lights
to
let
you
know,
your
truck
needs
highway
time
to
clean
the
DPF.
If
you
drive
after
the
warning
lights
come
on
too
long
the
DPF
gets
too
full,
you
will
loose
power
and
damage
the
expensive
filter.
Read
your
owners
manual
this
time.


There
are
aftermarket
engine
programmers
on
the
market
now
such
as

Superchips

that
will
force
the
engine
to
regenerate
when
you
want
to,
like
before
that
15
mile
grade
on
I-70
in
Utah
or
the
sled
pull
at
the
county
fair.
Next
emissions
hurdle
for
diesels
is
2010.
The
6.7L
Dodge
Cummins
diesel
is
the
only
engine
of
the
big
three
that
is
already
compliant
for
the
stricter
2010
requirement.
That
next
hurdle
in
2010
EPA
diesel
rules,
have
most
truck
manufactures
going
with
Urea
(exhaust
fluid)
to
lower
emissions.
I’d
like
to
see
them
add

CNG

.
Looks
like
International
(Navistar)
which
could
include
Ford
Power
Stroke
diesels
will
go
another
route,
with
larger
EGR
(exhaust
gas
recirculated)
instead
of
Urea.

 

Comments

comments

Log in with your credentials

Forgot your details?